Politics, Policy and Society Spoke

Changes in Chinese politics and adaptations in public policy are driving China’s re-emergence as a world power. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has set ambitious goals for the country’s future development. By 2021, the 100th anniversary of the founding of the CCP, the Xi Jinping administration has committed to eradicating poverty and achieving moderate prosperity for Chinese citizens. By 2049, the 100th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic, the leadership aims for China to achieve advanced, high-income nation status. China’s pursuit of these goals will directly impact the lives of 1.3 billion people and reverberate around the world. This spoke brings researchers together to examine, analyze and explain developments in domestic politics, public policy and society. Each year the spoke will identify strategic themes that will be the focus of collaborative activities.

Anita Chan

Anita Chan

Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, College of Asia & the Pacific

Tom Cliff

Tom Cliff

School of Culture, History & Language, College of Asia & the Pacific

Matthew Galway

Matthew Galway

School of Culture, History, and Language, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific

Ben Hillman

Ben Hillman

Crawford School of Public Policy, College of Asia & the Pacific

Dr Fengyuan Ji

Fengyuan Ji

School of Culture, History & Language, College of Asia & the Pacific

Jonathan	Unger

Jonathan Unger

Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, College of Asia & the Pacific

Bingqin Li

UNSW Arts, Design & Architecture

Yujie Zhu

Research School of Humanities and the Arts, College of Arts & Social Sciences

In 2021-22 the spoke will focus on understanding the longevity of China’s single-Party governing regime—the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP’s) success as a ruling party over multiple decades of dramatic social and economic change. The spoke will support a new book project on this theme, bringing together ANU and other Australian and international scholars to examine CCP longevity from multiple perspectives including history, culture, comparative politics, sociology and economics. The book project coincides with the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party (2021), which is an important milestone year for the current leadership’s ambitions for China’s great rejuvenation. The book project and related activities is tentatively dubbed “The China Model.”

• Funny Money and Political Authority in China Publication Workshop: This project includes a publication workshop that brought together leading and up-and-coming Sinologists from diverse disciplinary backgrounds to focus on the problem of ‘funny money’, and its effect on political authority in contemporary China. ‘Funny’ money is money that is non-legal—somehow tainted, but neither clearly illegal nor definitively legal. Funny money is so important and pervasive in China that it often goes unremarked. Many ordinary people make their livelihoods transacting in funny money; it lubricates the machinery of state, society, and the underworld. Funny money is inherently political but it has no specific political orientation. It may, for instance, be a tool of domination or a tool of resistance to domination. This ambivalence makes funny money worthy of closer academic scrutiny.

Updated:  6 October 2016/Responsible Officer:  Director/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team