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Publications

Made in China

Available at www.chinoiresie.info

Made in China, Vol.2, Issue 2: The Good Earth

2017, Ivan Franceschini, Nicholas Loubere, Andrea E. Pia

In this issue, Made in China considers the engagement of Chinese citizens with state policies on the environment, and looks into their potential for articulating workable grassroots alternatives. In particular, we consider the management of public resources—the so-called ‘commons’.

Made in China is a quarterly newsletter on Chinese labour, civil society, and rights.

This project has been produced with the financial assistance of the Australian Centre on China in the World, ANU, and the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654852.

China Story Yearbook 2016: Control

Available from ANU Press

China Story Yearbook 2016: Control

2016, Edited by Jane Golley, Linda Jaivin, and Luigi Tomba

‘More cosmopolitan, more lively, more global’ is how the China Daily summed up the year 2016 in China.

It was also a year of more control. The Chinese Communist Party laid down strict new rules of conduct for its members, continued to assert its dominance over everything from the Internet to the South China Sea and announced a new Five-Year Plan that Greenpeace called ‘quite possibly the most important document in the world in setting the pace of acting on climate change’.

The China Story Yearbook 2016: Control surveys the year in China’s economy, population planning, law enforcement and reform, environment, Internet, medicine, religion, education, historiography, foreign affairs, and culture, as well as developments in Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Made in China

Available at www.chinoiresie.info

Made in China, Vol.2, Issue 1: Fare Thee Well, Chinese Civil Society?

2017, Ivan Franceschini, Kevin Lin, Nicholas Loubere

With the arrest of yet another activist, the airing of yet another public confession, the closure of yet another NGO working for the weak and disenfranchised, and the passing of yet another repressive law, the world has come to view Chinese civil society as if it were on its deathbed. But maybe what is dying is just a dream of civil society with little basis in reality. While we mourn the death of an ideal, it is imperative that we overcome our sorrow to look at the momentous changes that are currently taking place in the realm of Chinese civil society. In this issue, we offer a series of perspectives on these developments.

Made in China is a quarterly newsletter on Chinese labour, civil society, and rights.

This project has been produced with the financial assistance of the Australian Centre on China in the World, ANU, and the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654852.

Available from ANU Press

Made in China Yearbook 2016: Disturbances in Heaven

2017, Ivan Franceschini, Kevin Lin, Nicholas Loubere

Labour and civil society are two fundamental components of international discussions concerning China today. Whether it is the arrest of labour activists or rights lawyers, the adoption of new industrial policies, or the passing of draconian rules on non-governmental organisations, the events occurring in these areas in China often make global headlines. At the same time, in spite of the grave challenges for workers and activists, the Chinese labour movement is witnessing significant developments, with the occurrence of some of the largest strikes in decades. All of this calls for more serious analysis from both scholars and practitioners, as well for critical engagement with a broader global audience interested in forging international solidarity. It is with these aims in mind that we have compiled this Made in China Yearbook 2016: Disturbances in Heaven, a collection of original articles by both scholars and activists, analysing the most important trends in Chinese labour and civil society over the past year. With its unique blend of in-depth scholarly work written in a direct, accessible style, this volume will allow readers to situate events and policies related to Chinese labour and civil society in a wider context, and serve as an indispensable reference book for international activists, practitioners, and policy-makers.

Joro's Youth

Available from ANU Press

Joro's Youth

2017, Igor de Rachewiltz, Li Narangoa

The epic of King Gesar of Ling is the national oral epic of Tibet, sung by itinerant bards in their land for many centuries but not recorded in print until recent times. Spreading widely beyond Tibet, there are extant versions in other languages of Central Asia. The first printed version is from Mongolia, produced on the orders of the Kangxi emperor of the Manchu Qing dynasty in the early 18th century. In the process of transmission, the original saga lost much of its Tibetan flavour, and this Qing edition can be regarded as a genuine Mongolian work. Its hero, Geser Khan in Mongolian, became a folk-hero, later deified both in China and Mongolia. Geser’s mission is to save the world from endemic evil and strife, bringing peace to all. Although he himself is the son of a god, Geser as a human is unpredictable, romantic and funny, and many of his adventures belong to the picaresque. This translation of the first, and one of the longest, chapters of the epic covers his miraculous birth, his turbulent youth, and his marriage to the beautiful Rogmo Goa. It celebrates and commemorates the 300th anniversary of the printing of the epic in Peking in early 1716.

Made in China

Available at www.chinoiresie.info

Made in China, Issue 4: Eye in the Sky

2016, Ivan Franceschini, Kevin Lin, Nicholas Loubere

In this issue, Made in China presents three distinct perspectives on how the party-state manages and controls Chinese society. First, they consider the role of labour law in China as a vehicle for reinforcing capitalist hegemony. They then look into the limitations of the welfare system in relation to migrant labour. Finally, they challenge some widely-held assumptions about the political nature of land-related social movements in the Chinese countryside. The issue also includes a forum on how precarisation has impacted the Chinese workforce and an article that reflects on the role of poetry as a form of resistance.

Made in China is a quarterly newsletter on Chinese labour, civil society, and rights.

This project has been produced with the financial assistance of the Australian Centre on China in the World, ANU, and the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654852.

Made in China

Available at www.chinoiresie.info

Made in China, Issue 3: Heart of Darkness?

2016, Ivan Franceschini, Kevin Lin, Nicholas Loubere

The core of this issue is dedicated to a special section on Chinese labour and investment in Africa, with a specific focus on Ghana and Zambia. You will also find an analysis of the current situation of the Chinese working classes and the prospects for the political representation of labour in China, as well as an analysis of the struggles that Chinese workers face when they attempt to access the legal system. The issue also includes an analysis of recent worker struggles in India and an essay on Zhao Liang’s Behemoth.

Made in China is a quarterly newsletter on Chinese labour, civil society, and rights.

This project has been produced with the financial assistance of the Australian Centre on China in the World, ANU, and the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654852.

China Story Yearbook 2015: Pollution

Available from ANU Press

China Story Yearbook 2015: Pollution

2016, Edited by Gloria Davies, Jeremy Goldkorn, and Luigi Tomba

Environmental pollution poses serious challenges for China, including to its economy as well as public health. The China Story Yearbook 2015: Pollution looks at how China’s Communist Party-state addresses these problems and how Chinese citizens have coped with and expressed their concerns about living with chronic, worsening pollution.

This Yearbook also explores the broader ramifications of pollution in the People’s Republic for culture, society law and social activism, as well as the Internet, language, thought, and approaches to history. It looks at how it affects economic and political developments, urban change, and China’s regional and global posture. The Chinese Communist Party, led by ‘Chairman of Everything’ Xi Jinping, meanwhile, has subjected mainland society to increasingly repressive control in its new determination to rid the country of Western ‘spiritual pollutants’ while achieving cultural purification through ‘propaganda and ideological work’.

To adulterate, contaminate, spoil or violate—these are among the metaphorical and literal connotations of pollution expressed in this Yearbook via the character ran 染, which forms part of the word for pollution in Chinese, wuran 污染. As the world increasingly relies on economic ties with China, the complexities of China’s one-party system and the Chinese government’s attitudes towards ‘pollution’ are of increasing global significance.

Made in China

Available at www.chinoiresie.info

Made in China, Issue 2

2016, Ivan Franceschini, Kevin Lin, Nicholas Loubere

Besides the usual summaries of recent events in China, in this issue you will find articles on the struggles of Walmart workers in China, the limits of the ‘rights awakening’ of Chinese workers, and the political implications of resorting to microcredit to alleviate unemployment. Included is also a Forum in which prominent legal experts put the concept of the ‘rule of law’ in China in a wider historical and political perspective and a compendium of the new Law on the Management of Foreign NGOs’ Activities within Mainland China.

Made in China is a quarterly newsletter on Chinese labour, civil society, and rights.

This project has been produced with the financial assistance of the Australian Centre on China in the World, ANU, and the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654852.

Legal Reforms and Deprivation of Liberty in Contemporary China

Available at Routledge

Legal Reforms and Deprivation of Liberty in Contemporary China

2016, Edited by Elisa Nesossi, Sarah Biddulph, Flora Sapio and Susan Trevaskes

The volume presents an extensive investigation into the process of reforms of detention powers in today’s China and offers an in-depth analysis of the debates surrounding the reformist attempts. The chapters in this collection demonstrate that legislative and institutional reforms in this area result from political opportunities - openings and tensions at the central institutional levels of political authority - and contingent social and political factors.

This publication is a result of China Justice workshop in 2013.

Made in China

Available at www.chinoiresie.info

Made in China, Issue 1

2016, Ivan Franceschini and Kevin Lin

Made in China is a quarterly newsletter on Chinese labour, civil society, and rights.

In recent years, the Chinese labour movement has witnessed significant developments, not only with the occurrence of some of the largest strikes in decades but also the emergence of grave challenges for workers and activists. Made in China springs from the belief that this calls for more serious analysis from both scholars and practitioners, as well for a critical engagement with a broader international audience interested in forging international solidarity.

This project has been produced with the financial assistance of the Australian Centre on China in the World, ANU, and the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 654852.

China & ANU

Available through ANU Press

China & ANU

2015, William Sima

The Pacific War and its aftermath radically transformed Australian perceptions of whatwas then called the ‘Near North’. Many recognised that in the postwar world Australia’s strategic interests and economic fortunes called for a new understanding of Asia and the Pacific. China loomed large in these calculations.

Based on extensive research and featuring rare archival documents and photographs, China & ANU introduces the diplomats, adventurers and scholars who contributed to Australia’s engagement with China, the ‘Chinese Commonwealth’ and our region from the 1940s-1950s. In particular, this book focuses on the interconnection between Australia’s first diplomat-scholars in China and the founding of Chinese Studies at the newly established Australian National University.

Published by:
ANU Press

China Story Yearbook 2014: Shared Destiny

Available through ANU Press


China Story Yearbook 2014: Shared Destiny

2015, Edited by Geremie R Barmé with Linda Jaivin and Jeremy Goldkorn

Humanity as never before shares a common destiny, whether it be in terms of the resources of the planet, the global environment, economic integration, or the movement of peoples, ideas, cultures. For better or worse humankind is a Community of Shared Destiny 命运共同体.

The People’s Republic of China under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party and its ‘Chairman of Everything’, Xi Jinping, has declared that it shares in the destiny of the countries of the Asia and Pacific region, as well as of nations that are part of an intertwined national self-interest. The Party, according to Marxist-Leninist-Maoist theory, is the vanguard of progressive social forces; it cleaves to the concept of shared destiny and its historical role in shaping that destiny. Since its early days nearly a century ago it has emphasised the collective over the individual, the end rather than the means. It addresses majority opinion while guiding and moulding the agenda both for today, and for the future.

Published by:
ANU Press

The Politics of Law and Stability in China

Available through Edward Elgar Publishing and on Amazon


The Politics of Law and Stability in China

2014, Edited Susan Trevaskes, Elisa Nesossi, Flora Sapio and Sarah Biddulph

The Politics of Law and Stability in China examines the nexus between social stability and the law in contemporary China. It explores the impact of Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) rationales for social stability on legal reforms, criminal justice operations and handling of disputes and social unrest inside and outside China’s justice agencies. The book presents an extensive investigation into the conceptual and empirical approaches by the Party-state to control Chinese citizens and to respond to what it sees as potentially de-stabilising social action such as public protest, discord, deviance and criminal behaviour. This timely and important study reaches across a broad variety of areas within the legal sphere, including substantive criminal law and criminal procedure law reform, labour law, environment and land disputes, policing and surveillance, and anti-corruption drives. The central thread running through all the chapters concerns how the imperative of social stability has underpinned key Party-state approaches to social management and responses to crime, legal disputes and social unrest across the last decade in China.

Published by:
Edward Elgar Publishing

A New Australia-China Agenda

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A New Australia–China Agenda: Experts on the Australia-China Relationship

2014, Edited by Geremie R Barmé and Ryan Manuel

The Australia-China relationship touches on virtually every aspect of our national life.Australia and China trade in goods as well as in culture, politics and people, ideas and education, community and personalities. This volume is a polyphonic collection of expert ideas and suggestions that we hope will be part of the ongoing Australia-China discussion.

Published by:
Australian Centre on China in the World, Australian National University

Editorial Style Guide for Authors of the China Story

Available through Cornell University Press and on Amazon


The Government Next Door
Neighborhood Politics in Urban China

2014, Luigi Tomba

Chinese residential communities are places of intense governing and an arena of active political engagement between state and society. In The Government Next Door, Luigi Tomba investigates how the goals of a government consolidated in a distant authority materialise in citizens' everyday lives. Chinese neighborhoods reveal much about the changing nature of governing practices in the country. Government action is driven by the need to preserve social and political stability, but such priorities must adapt to the progressive privatization of urban residential space and an increasingly complex set of societal forces. Tomba’s vivid ethnographic accounts of neighborhood life and politics in Beijing, Shenyang, and Chengdu depict how such local 'translation' of government priorities takes place.

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Published by:
Cornell University Press

Yearbook 2012: Red Rising, Red Eclipse

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Yearbook 2013: Civilising China

2013, Edited by Geremie R. Barmé

As China becomes wealthier and more confident on the global stage, it also expects to be respected and accommodated as a major global force – and as a formidable civilisation. Through a survey and analysis of China’s regional posture, urban change, social activism and law, mores, the Internet, history and thought – in which the concept of ‘civilising’ plays a prominent role – China Story Yearbook 2013 offers insights into the country today and its dreams for the future.

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Published by:
Australian Centre on China in the World, Australian National University

 

The Australia-China Investment Relationship

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The Australia-China Investment Relationship: Law, Governance and Policy

2013, Edited by Geoffrey Nicoll, Gerard Brennan and Jane Golley

The first Australia-China Investment Relationship Conference was conceived around the investment laws and regulatory regimes in Australia and China, the financial systems in both countries, and the governance and regulation of corporate and government entities in both countries. Focusing upon these critical aspects of the relationship begins as an exercise in comparative law but given the currency and urgency of the issues compels researchers to find solutions to the sticking points in law, governance and policy.

Published by:
Faculty of Business, Government and Law University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
College of Comparative Law, China University of Political Science and Law, Beijing, China
Australian Centre on China in the World, College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

 

Yearbook 2012: Red Rising, Red Eclipse

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Yearbook 2012: Red Rising, Red Eclipse

2012, Edited by Geremie R. Barmé

The China Story Yearbook brings together the various talents of the Australian Centre on China in the World. It is aimed at the engaged public, as well as specialists, journalists, businesspeople, diplomats and students. The inaugural Yearbook is titled Red Rising, Red Eclipse, and it covers the period from 2009 to mid 2012. Produced by academics and writers who are members of or who are affiliated with the Centre the Yearbook offers a survey of Chinese politics, law, economics, regional diplomacy, Internet politics, thought, history and culture featuring academic analysis as well as a range of information lists and data compiled by the Centre in coordination with our collaborators at Danwei Media under the direction of Jeremy Goldkorn. The Yearbook took its final form during editorial discussions with Jeremy Goldkorn in March 2012 at Capital M, Qianmen, Beijing.

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Published by:
Australian Centre on China in the World, Australian National University

 

Australia and China and the United States

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Australia and China and the United States

2010, Scott Dewar

This paper was prepared while the author, Mr Scott Dewar, was a Visiting Fellow at the Australian Centre on China in the World on secondment from the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). Mr Dewar has previously worked in the offices of prime ministers Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard. The present text offers Mr Dewar's personal views and in no way represents those of the Australian Government, the Australian Centre on China in the World or The Australian National University.

Updated:  11 July 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, China in the World /Page Contact:  China in the World